Rabbits

 

The Miwok people hunted both jackrabbits (eplaali; Elena McCauley or Nick Villa Sr. or Rose Darrow) and cotton tails (hikaaky; Elena McCauley or Rose Darrow).

 

Sacramento Union January 19, 1880

 

“On Tuesday last the Indians of Jackson (Amador) and vicinity mustered, to the number of between twenty and thirty, for their annual migration to Jackson valley. They generally go there once a year to hunt rabbits and other game, and stay usually from two to three weeks.  As they filed away to the hunting ground they formed a grotesque picture.  They were of all ages, and of both sexes, and dressed in every style of superannuated costume.  The majority had to foot it; but a few were mounted.  Amid the yelping of the dogs, and the yelling of the papooses they moved like the fragment of a demoralized army, their tattered garments flapping in the breeze, and keeping time to the sighing of the wind among the trees.”

 

The following accounts were gathered in 2021, funded through a grant from the First Nations Development Institute:

 

Hunting Rabbits

 

Myra Hobart telling about her father (Elmer Moman) hunting rabbits for the first time as a young boy in Jackson Valley in the 1920s

Laverne Childs tells about hunting rabbits in Jackson Valley as young boy in the 1950s (Part 1)

Laverne Childs tells about hunting rabbits in Jackson Valley as young boy in the 1950s (Part 2)

Laverne Childs tells about hunting rabbits in Jackson Valley as young boy in the 1950s (Part 3)

Glen Villa Sr. tells about hunting rabbits in Jackson Valley as a young boy in the 1960s

 

 

Skinning and Butchering Rabbits

 

Glen Villa Sr. tells how rabbits were skinned and butchered (Part 1)

Glen Villa Sr. tells how rabbits were skinned and butchered (Part 2)

 

 

Cooking Rabbits

 

Dolly Suehead tells how rabbits were cooked